There are 3 ballot issues that have been approved by the Longmont City Council for inclusion in the 2017 election. Before it's time to cast your vote, get the 4-1-1 on each issue and make a truly informed decision.

 

No matter what your stance, be sure you participate on Election Day, November 7th!

 

Water Storage Bond - Ballot Question 2J

 

 

What is it all about? The City of Longmont is requesting the issuance of bonds to fund construction of a water supply reservoir for Longmont's use.

 

Why? Currently, Longmont is one of several cities that have water rights in the Windy Gap Project; water diverted from the Colorado River that is at this time held in Lake Granby. During wet periods when the lake is full, there's nowhere to store the excess water! The goal is to have additional storage space during wet periods, and a surplus available during dry times.

 

How will it be built, and where? Construction and management of the project will be managed by the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District on behalf of 12 different participants. The reservoir would be built just west of Carter Lake and would be approximately the same size (90,000 acre feet). 

 

What would this cost residents? The proposal is to increase water rates by 13% in 2018 and 10% in 2019. For example, if someone's water bill is currently $36.07, it would instead cost $37.39. 

 

Arguments FOR....

* Significant opportunity for Longmont to secure both the current and future water supply for the city

* Bond financing has initially lower user rates than if cash were used to fund this project

* Costs are more equitably distributed among current and future Longmont residents 

* Continued contributions will come from fees paid on building permits

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Arguments AGAINST....

* Longmont doesn't have a need for this much water now or in the future 

* Alternative funding sources should be involved rather than the city itself 

* There are other options available out there to address the issue of city water

 

 

Public Safety Tax - Ballot Question 2H

 

 

What is it all about? Did you know that the Longmont community has grown by over 10,000 people in the past 10 years? As a result, the City is asking voters to approve an increase in the public safety tax. 

 

What effect does the growth in our community have, from a public safety perspective? Some of the most obvious effects are recorded increases in service calls, violent crime (increased by 20%), traffic volume, accidents and traffic-related fatalities, and computer fraud and technology-related crimes. 

 

What would the increased tax be used for? It will be used to hire more police officers, dispatchers, firefights and necessary support staff, as well as all the equipment and facilities needed to provide public safety services.

 

What would this cost residents? The increase to 0.255% is approximately 2.55 cents for every $10 spent on taxable goods. 

 

Arguments FOR...

* This tax increase is necessary to properly align police and fire services with the safety needs of Longmont

* In order to better address 9-1-1 demands, emergency dispatchers must be properly supported

* Longmont is currently behind the ball on providing these critical services to the community, despite its undeniable growth

 

Arguments AGAINST...

* Shouldn't the growth within the community pay it's own way for increased needs?

* It's the duty of the city to prioritize city services as needed, not simply increase taxes

 

 

Marijuana Tax - Ballot Issue 21

 

 

What is this all about? This particular issue is two-fold. 1.) The city council is considering allowing 4 retail marijuana stores within Longmont city limits and 2.) Put in place an additional tax on the sales in said stores.

 

Are you saying that all residents will pay this tax? NO. Only people who purchase trail marijuana within Longmont city limits will pay this tax! 

 

How much would the tax be? 3%, or 3 cents per dollar spent on marijuana products. 

 

What would the proceeds be used for? Half of the tax collected will likely be used for various expenses related to the retail marijuana sales; licensing, inspections and public safety services. The other half will be used to fund affordable housing. 

 

Arguments FOR... 

* An additional cost will be incurred by allowing retail marijuana stores to open shop within the city limits, and an additional tax will be necessary to support that

* Tax revenue will be used for affordable housing

* There is an opportunity to collect revenue from other Colorado residents surrounding Longmont from other communities in which retail marijuana sales are prohibited

* Currently, Longmont is losing out on revenue collection because Longmont residents are traveling to nearby Boulder, Lafayette and Louisville and contributing taxes to those communities instead

 

Arguments AGAINST...

* There is no clear use guarantee that the funds will go directly to affordable housing

* Other communities along the Front Range have lower tax rates than this proposal, meaning Longmont won't be able to compete anyway

* Additional taxes specifically target marijuana users to pay for city services, and why should marjiuana use be taxed any differently than clothes, food and other products?